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A FEW TIPS re managing copyright, trademarks and intellectual property  [Please note, the postings on this blog are for informational purposes only and do not constitute legal advice]   ...follow and subscribe to this blog on wordpress

Entries in Copyright (99)

Tuesday
Sep262017

What does Copyright Protect? (Great Question!)

Asking what copyright protects is a great question!

Copyright is a form of intellectual property law that protects "original works of authorship" including literary, musical, artistic and dramatic works, such as photographs, articles, novels, sound recordings, sheet music, lyrics, jewelry designs, artwork, graffiti, poetry, screen plays, children's books, user manuals, website content, movies, computer software, and architecture. [THE KEY is that the material (or work) is ORIGINAL].

Can I copyright a name, title, slogan, or short phrase? In most cases, No.  These things may be protected as trademarks. However, copyright protection may be available for logo artwork. In some circumstances, an artistic logo may also be protected as a trademark.

Can I copyright the name of my band? No. Names are not protected by copyright law. Some names may be protected under trademark law.

Can I copyright my domain name? No. Domain names are not protected by copyright law. Some domain protection may be available under trademark law.

Can I copyright my idea?  No.  Copyright does not protect ideas, concepts, systems, or methods of doing something. You may express your ideas in writing or drawings and claim copyright in your description (for example, a user manual), but be aware that copyright will not protect the idea itself as revealed in your written or artistic work.

Excerpt from the U.S Copyright Office at: www.copyright.gov/help/faq/faq-protect.html.

See also: “How to write a © Copyright Notice and Why to Use it” at http://wp.me/p10nNq-18; blog posts on trademarks and trademark registration at https://iplegalfreebies.wordpress.com/category/t-r-a-d-e-m-a-r-k; "Copyright Basics" at www.copyright.gov/circs/circ01.pdf ; "Copyright Protection Not Available for Names, Titles, or Short Phrases" at www.scireg.org/us_copyright_registration/circs/circ34.pdf ; @iplegalfreebies and www.iplegalfreebies.wordpress.com.

Wednesday
Apr262017

Happy World Intellectual Property Day!

April 26 is World Intellectual Property Day!  Let's celebrate the role that intellectual property rights (patents, trademarks, industrial designs, & copyright) play in encouraging innovation and creativity.  Innovation and creativity makes our lives healthier, safer, more comfortable and more fun, turning problems into progress. Intellectual property systems support innovation by attracting investment, rewarding creators, and encouraging creators to develop their ideas.

WHAT IS INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY?

Intellectual property (IP) refers to creations of the mind, such as inventions; literary and artistic works; designs; and symbols, names and images used in commerce. IP is protected in law by, for example, patents, copyright and trademarks, which enable people to earn recognition or financial benefit from what they invent or create.  [Text is from the WIPO (World Intellectual Property Organization) website http://www.wipo.int/ip-outreach/en/ipday/ and http://www.wipo.int/about-ip/en/]

I'm celebrating today!

Vanessa Kaster, Esq., LL.M.

 
vk@kasterlegal.com
 

See also: “How to write a © Copyright Notice and Why to Use it” at http://wp.me/p10nNq-18; Posts on trademark topics for new businesses: https://goo.gl/xqJrOA; #valueyourart, #valueyou; @iplegalfreebies and www.iplegalfreebies.wordpress.com.

Monday
Aug312015

New Rules for Creative Revenue

Creative revenue streams – Here are a few of my favorites:FullSizeRender (8)

  • Inexpensive monthly subscription fees for access to video tutorials (for example teaching folks to use photography equipment or to play an instrument)
  • Parlaying social media followers into an eager audience for a book launch.
  • Composing music scores for videos and films. (It’s often much more economical for film and video makers to commission original compositions than to try and get rights to popular songs.  When I saw a preview of the documentary “Doing It In The Park: Pick-Up Basketball New York City” one of the filmmakers shared that he wished he’d commissioned an all original score from the outset).
  • Demonstration YouTube videos that include a retailer affiliate link. (Retailer affiliate links make money when folks click the link and make a purchase).

I believe that smart, creative, entrepreneurial folks can rise to the top, get noticed and make money (if they want to).

BY: Vanessa Kaster, Esq., LL.M.

vk@kasterlegal.com

See also: “How to write a © Copyright Notice and Why to Use it” at http://wp.me/p10nNq-18; Posts on trademark topics for new businesses: https://goo.gl/xqJrOA; #creativerevenue, #valueyourart, #valueyou; @iplegalfreebies and www. iplegalfreebies.wordpress.com.

Thursday
Jun042015

Happy 225th Birthday – US Copyright Law

Happy Birthday US Copyright!  This week is the 225th anniversary of the first Federal US Copyright Law, FullSizeRender (3)which was signed into law by President George Washington on May 31, 1790.  The 1st US Copyright Law was enacted less than 2 years after the ratification of the U.S. Constitution and was modeled after the British Statute of Anne.  Kudos to the First Congress of the US!  Here is a bit more information on the 1st US Copyright Law:

The law was called “An Act for the encouragement of learning,” and it protected “maps, Charts, and books.” The decision to protect maps and charts indicates that the First Congress wanted to encourage exploration of the American continent, including its lakes, rivers, and harbors. The decision to protect books confirms that the First Congress also valued the creation and distribution of authorship, both for informational and artistic purposes. These objectives are reflected in the works that were registered in the first month after enactment, which included an atlas, a spelling book, a collection of court decisions, and a “comedy in five acts.”

The first federal copyright law established many of the fundamental principles that are a vital part of the law today. It stated that copyright initially belongs to the author—the person who conceived and created the work— rather than the publisher or the state. At the same time, it recognized that an author’s rights are not perpetual but instead should be limited in time. And it recognized that authors are part of a larger economic ecosystem, and that they often transfer their rights to publishers, retailers, or other parties. The first federal copyright law established the principle that authors should have rights to control the use of their works, such as how they are printed, reprinted, published, and sold. It recognized that authors should have meaningful remedies to encourage others to respect these rights and to provide appropriate compensation when those rights are infringed. And it recognized the central role a registration system plays in documenting a public record of creativity, ownership, term, and other legal facts.   [Excerpt from the US Copyright Office commemoration at http://www.copyright.gov]

US Copyright Law has changed a lot in the last two centuries including offering copyright protection to a broader spectrum of works.  For example, US Copyright registration and protection is now available for computer software and website content which were not conceivable in 1790. (Not even a figment in George Washington’s imagination).   The full text of the 1st US Copyright Law is available at http://copyright.gov/about/1790-copyright-act.html  and the current US Copyright Law is available at http://www.copyright.gov/title17/circ92.pdf.

BY: Vanessa Kaster, Esq., LL.M.

vk@kasterlegal.com

See also: Information on how to write a copyright notice at http://wp.me/p10nNq-18; other blog posts on copyright at https://iplegalfreebies.wordpress.com/category/c-o-p-y-r-i-g-h-t/;  the US Copyright Office’s website at www.copyright.gov; @iplegalfreebies and www.iplegalfreebies.wordpress.com.

Thursday
May282015

Inspired by 19th Century Imperial Robes (Copyright & Design)

Splendid 19th century imperial robes from China inspire modern fashion reddesigns in a new costume exhibit at the Metropolitan Museum of Art (titled: China Through the Looking Glass).  A fascinating element of this exhibit is that the imperial robes and the modern, couture gowns are displayed side-by-side.  While the styles, silhouettes and lines of the old and new fashions are drastically different, the inspiration linking the old and new is clear, including, borrowed colors, designs and artwork.

Borrowing colors, designs and artwork isn’t always free and easy.  Copyright laws in countries around the world vest the original creators and owners of designs and artwork with a bundle of exclusive rights to control the use and copying of their original designs and artwork.  However, these exclusive rights only last for a finite period of time. The duration of these exclusive rights varies country by country depending upon the national copyright laws.  The copyright laws in each country outline the length of time that the exclusive rights last (also known as the “term of copyright”).  Once the term of copyright expires, the work becomes part of the public domain and is free to use and copy.

Treat yourself to a visit of this exhibit, if you can. I give it two glamorous thumbs up.

BY: Vanessa Kaster, Esq., LL.M.

vk@kasterlegal.com

See also: other blog posts on public domain at http://wp.me/p10nNq-ft and www.iplegalfreebies.wordpress.com/category/public-domain; a blog post on Traditional Knowledge of indigenous people and tribes which can be an exception to public domain works at http://wp.me/p10nNq-AC; information about the MET costume exhibit at http://www.metmuseum.org/exhibitions/listings/2015/china-through-the-looking-glass/images; @iplegalfreebies and www.iplegalfreebies.wordpress.com.